Opportunities with Real Estate ISAs and OSAs

May 21, 2015 2:59:45 PM
Keller INK's research has shown that two key positions have gained prominence among top real estate agents: inbound/outbound sales associates and showing assistants.

As with all team positions, these roles have unique challenges and opportunities in regard to hiring, compensating, training, and holding them accountable to results. The following information can help determine the value of adding these roles to your team as you grow your real estate businesses.

The Inbound Sales Associate

An “inbound sales associate” (ISA) is similar to a lead coordinator. This person is responsible for working and nurturing incoming leads, such as web leads, sign leads, and leads from their team’s spheres.

Quote that reads -  The ISA position. I am really passionate about it  because I believe that is what turns the screw to that  long-term follow-up

Opportunity: A dedicated associate to handle inbound leads.

Having a person dedicated to following up with Internet and other inbound inquiries, an ISA, can prevent an agent from letting Internet leads and other valuable connections fall through the cracks.

This position initially gained popularity in the industry when real estate teams began to need a centralized clearing house for Internet leads. Additionally, the need for a nurturer in this role typically does not align with the behavioral characteristics of many agents, so the agents were not giving this position the attention it required. Today, even though Internet leads are diluted, these positions still offer a way for agents to leverage the lead follow-up so they can spend time focusing on other areas of their business. The ISA is responsible for working and cultivating the leads an agent already has, such as web leads, sign leads, and leads from their team’s spheres.


The Outbound Sales Associate

An “outbound sales associate” (OSA) is similar to a telemarketer. The outbound associate typically lead generates and sets appointments through cold-calling. Showing assistants are responsible for finding and showing homes to interested buyers, and are also fairly recent additions to many agents’ organizational charts.

Tim Heyl says, " It takes about six months to break even on an  investment in an OSA, but then the second six months  can be really good. At the end of twelve months, I was  experiencing roughly a 9x return on investment on my  first OSA.

Opportunity: A dedicated associate cold-calling potential leads.

An agent who employs an associate committed to making outbound cold calls to lead-rich sources, like expireds or a farm area, can generate new business. This position is beneficial for an agent to employ because it provides agents with their most valuable resource: time. When an OSA is fixed on setting appointments, an agent only has to worry about going on those appointments and building their business.


Showing Assistants

Showing assistants are responsible for finding and showing homes to interested buyers, and are also fairly recent additions to many real estate agents’ organizational charts. In the 3L Blueprints eBook, KellerINK explores these four common challenges with showing assistants:

1. Testing the waters instead of making a commitment to the success of the model.
2. The position has not been sold to the team as an opportunity for income growth.
3. Buyer agents are cherry-picking leads.
4. Dropping the ball when passing a buyer to a showing assistant

You can read the full article about showing assistants and learn the solutions to these four common challenges with showing assistants.

Download your FREE copy of the 3L Blueprints: Leads, Listings, Leverage eBook from KellerINKto read more.